A downloadable conversational rpg

Buy Now$3.00 USD or more

DEATH OF A HERO is a conversational role-playing game about a group of adventurers grieving a fallen party member after they heroically sacrificed themselves to defeat the Villain.

Throughout the game you will take turns developing and discussing the story of the Hero, from when the party was first formed to the Hero's death. By this act of remembrance, you will deal with hidden emotions held for yourself and the Hero as you slowly come to terms with their death.

"Most immersive obituary simulator, I griefed for a person I never knew." - playtester #1

"Can be used as a very good way for world building. Our group established a lot of histories and cultural concepts while playing this. And yes, very easy way to get players emotionally immersed" - playtester #2

Purchase

Buy Now$3.00 USD or more

In order to download this conversational rpg you must purchase it at or above the minimum price of $3 USD. You will get access to the following files:

DEATH OF A HERO3.pdf 127 kB

Comments

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(+1)

A really excellent experiance. Very emotionally cathartic. i'd definitely play again.

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Death of a Hero is a one-shot storytelling game where you show the different ways that a fallen adventurer is remembered by their comrades. Players randomly generate how they feel about the hero,  and then take turns sharing that.

The gameplay isn't quite cohesive, as the game prompts you to come up with a lot of details on your own and then check them against the rest of the group's private stories, but honestly I feel like this could could be a mechanic. Just skip the timeframe forward seventy years, and suddenly it's about how everyone remembers history and myth differently.

Overall, this is a cool and possibly emotionally intense funeral-simulator that is probably a best fit for groups that really like storytelling and acting.

(+1)

Glad you like it!

About your point about the contradicting stories, I’d say my take on it (death of the author and whatnot) is that your stories are SUPPOSED to contradict because memory and history is funky like that.

What is truth? What isn’t truth?! In the times I’ve ran it there was a certain satisfaction in how the players negotiated their contradicting memories and feelings - just like how real memories and feeling contradict.

Mayhaps I should make an update

(+1)

I really like the contradiction element. This might be a reader error, but I just didn't feel like the doc supported it. It felt like the push was for the stories to synch up and make sense, not for players to really lean into looking at the contradictions between stories.

It's still a cool game either way.

A little bit of guidance on how to contradict stories a little (agree on some basic details first, then individually come up with differences) might help, but I don't think it's required to play.

(+1)

Great way to spend an evening with friends, I've played it once and can't wait to play it again and again.